• Things you might not realize are cybercrimes:
    • Unfortunately, cybercrime is on the rise and increasingly impacts us all
    • Thanks to constant press coverage, many folks are familiar with cybercrimes such as identity theft, ransomware and data breaches
    • While the public's awareness of cybercrime is growing, there are some things that people do without necessarily realizing they are crimes, including:
      • Impersonating someone online:
        • Depending on state laws you could be guilty of several crimes including
          • Identity theft
          • Fraud
          • Copyright violations
      • Guessing/cracking someone else's password and using to it access their accounts/systems:
      • Trolling/Cyberbullying:
        • Most states have some form bullying laws and states are increasingly expanding them to include electronic harassment
        • In some instances, existing laws have been used to prosecute people in high profile cases that have lead to suicide
      • Doxxing:
        • "Doxxing is the Internet-based practice of researching and broadcasting private or identifiable information (especially personally identifiable information) about an individual or organization... It is closely related to internet vigilantism and hacktivism." - Wikipedia
        • "Doxing may be carried out for various reasons, including to aid law enforcement, business analysis, extortion, coercion, harassment, online shaming, and vigilante justice." - Wikipedia
      • Revenge Porn:
        • "Revenge Porn is the sexually explicit portrayal of one or more people that is distributed without their consent via any medium.The sexually explicit images or video may be made by a partner of an intimate relationship with the knowledge and consent of the subject, or it may be made without his or her knowledge. The possession of the material may be used by the perpetrators to blackmail the subjects into performing other sex acts, to coerce them into continuing the relationship, or to punish them for ending the relationship. " - Wikipedia
        • 35 states have laws against revenge porn, you can view the list here: https://www.cybercivilrights.org/revenge-porn-laws/
    • It's important to stay abreast of the changing face of cyber law to ensure that you don't find yourself in legal trouble
  • Minimize digital eye strain:
    • Most of us spend more time than ever staring at a screen at work and at home
    • March is Workplace Eye Wellness Month and it's important to understand the impact of all this screen time on your eyes
    • Dr. Kyle Schwalbe says "Eyes, when they’re focused on computers, blink half as much as they otherwise would"
    • Techitis is a new term that describes eye strain and other issues caused by the constant use of digital devices
      • Computer-related eye problems have become widespread: according to a 2015 survey by The Vision Council, 65% of American adults reported symptoms of digital eye strain, also known as Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS)
      • Symptoms include:
        • Red, dry or irritated eyes
        • Blurred vision
        • Eye fatigue
        • Back, neck and shoulder pain
        • Headaches
      • Recent research conducted by British psychologists found young adults use their smartphones roughly twice as much as they estimate that they do, as much as five hours a day or roughly one-third of their total waking hours
      • The fact that we use our phones twice as many times as we think we do indicates that a lot of smartphone use seems to be habitual, automatic behaviors that we have no awareness of,” Dr. Sally Andrews, a psychologist at Nottingham Trent University
      • Screen-sightedness is so named because of a rise in nearsightedness thought to be caused by staring at the small screens on smartphones
      • Too much time looking at screens can lead to other issues such as dry eyes and cornea problems
    • Some tips to reduce digital eye strain:
      • Sit about 25 to 40 inches from the monitor
      • Follow the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes take a 20 second break and look at something 20 feet away
      • Give your eyes a rest throughout the day
      • Intentionally blink more often
      • Adjust the fonts on your screens to make it easier to read
      • Get your lighting right. Your ambient lighting should be about half as bright as that typically found in most offices
      • Minimize glare
      • Upgrade your monitor
      • Position the monitor so the top is at eye level or slightly below
      • Have a viewing angle of no more than 35 degrees from the monitor
      • Adjust the monitor settings such as brightness, contrast and color temperature
      • Make sure your contact lenses and glasses prescriptions are up to date
      • Computer glasses can reduce digital eye strain and the potentially damaging effects of constant digital use. They can help the eye adjust to intermediate distance objects such as monitors and can decrease glare and increase contrast
      • If your eyes feel dry, use high-quality artificial tears intermittently
    • You can get more information here: http://www.allaboutvision.com/cvs/
  • The continued rise of digital border searches:
    • An increasing number of travelers entering the U.S. are being asked to turn over their electronic devices for inspection
    • Statistics released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) show the rate of digital border searches is on track to quadruple since 2015
    • The increase appears to have begun before President Donald Trump’s promise to scrutinize incoming visitors with “extreme vetting” measures
    • Nearly 15,000 travelers had a device searched at the border in the last six months. Only 8,503 were searched between October 2014 and October 2015 and 19,033 were searched in 2016
    • At the current pace, agents will search about 30,000 travelers by the end of the fiscal year. That's a 33% increase
    • Despite the increasing rate, the percentage of travelers who are searched is small, about 8 out of 100,000
    • Typically, travelers are selected for a secondary screening at an international checkpoint such as an airport or a land border crossing
    • A travelers might be targeted because they’re flagged or because a customs agent deems their behavior suspicious
    • Officers leverage a broad exception to the Fourth Amendment at the border to search without a warrant
    • It's know well known that the government has advanced hacking tools that it can use to break into devices
    • CBP says the increase in searches reflects “current threat information,” but they have not elaborated
    • An example of the kind of cases that digital border searches solve is a Vermont man arrested for allegedly having sex with a 13-year-old girl. The pair was stopped trying to enter from Canada. An inspection of the girl’s phone found texts suggesting a sexual relationship with the 25-year-old man
    • US Senators Ron Wyden and Rand Paul introduced a bill that requiring agents to get a warrant before conducting an electronic search at the border
    • "Americans' constitutional rights shouldn't disappear at the border," Wyden said in a statement. "By requiring a warrant to search Americans' devices and prohibiting unreasonable delay, this bill makes sure that border agents are focused on criminals and terrorists instead of wasting their time thumbing through innocent Americans' personal photos and other data."
    • A bipartisan pair of representatives sponsored the same bill in the House
    • "The Protecting Data at the Border Act is timely legislation that would rein in Customs and Border Protection,” said Electronic Frontier Foundation staff attorney Sophia Cope told The Hill. “In recent months, we have seen an alarming increase in the number of invasive device searches at the border.”