Tech Friday with Dave Hatter - June 19th 2020 - SPONSORED BY INTRUST IT


  • Facebook's new "Manage Activity" feature allows you to delete old content:
    • Facebook announced the Manage Activity feature in a recent blog post
    • They wrote "Whether you’re entering the job market after college or moving on from an old relationship, we know things change in people’s lives, and we want to make it easy for you to curate your presence on Facebook to more accurately reflect who you are today"
    • According to Facebook, this feature will allow you to archive and/or delete old posts from one place
    • The archive feature allows you to keep your content but make it inaccessible to anyone else
    • The delete feature allows you to move posts you no longer want to the trash
    • Posts sent to trash are deleted after 30 days unless you choose to manually delete or restore them sooner
    • Manage Activity will allow you to view and manage your posts in bulk, using filters to quickly select relevant posts. For example, you can find posts that include specific people or within a specified date range.
    • Manage Activity is available on Facebook Lite now and is coming to Facebook Mobile and desktop soon
    • Facebook said they will continue adding functionality to the tool to help folks manage their digital footprint
    • Read the blog post here and stay tuned:https://about.fb.com/news/2020/06/introducing-manage-activity/
  • Some ransomware decryption tools are actually ransomware:
    • Ransomware is a form of malware that encrypts your data and then holds it hostage for a ransom
    • You must pay the ransom to get the decryption key or your data will be permanently inaccessible
    • Some newer forms of ransomware will also threaten to expose your data on the Internet if your don't pay the ransom
    • The FBI has recommended that you do not pay the ransom, and even if you do pay, there is no guarantee that the data can be recovered
    • Decryption tools have been developed for some ransomware so that you can unlock your data without paying the ransom
    • While there are legitimate free tools to decrypt your ransomware infected data, there is now ransomware that pretends to decrypt other ransomware
    • If you get hit with ransomware, do not rely on search results that claim to provide software to decrypt your data, it may more ransomware will encrypt your data again
    • For example, a fake tool named Decrypter Djvu purports to decrypt the Stop Djvu ransomware. But it contains Zorab, which will encrypt the data a second time and demand a second ransom
    • If you look for tools to decrypt your data for free, you must be very careful and only use tools from known reputable companies such as anti-virus vendors
    • The No More Ransomware Project (run by Interpol and IT companies) is a legitimate site chock full of ransomware information and in some cases ransomware decryption tools. You will find it here:https://www.nomoreransom.org/en/index.html
    • Be very skeptical about clicking links in unsolicited emails and texts, and don't open any attachments
    • Ensure that you have anti-malware (anti-virus software)
    • Install software updates regularly
    • Only install software from known, reputable sources and vet it carefully
    • Regular backups of your data is one of the best cures if you are unfortunately hit with ransomware
    • You should try to keep the files encrypted by ransomware because a tool could be developed to decrypt the malware in the future
  • Internal CIA report says Elite CIA hacking unit failed to secure their own systems leading to leak:
    • An internal CIA report said that lax security was partly to blame for "Vault 7", one of the largest known leaks in the history of U.S. intelligence
    • Sen. Ron Wyden provided a redacted and incomplete copy of the report to the Washington Post
    • The report concluded that the theft of hacking tools from the CIA in 2016 was caused by the CIA's agency’s prioritization of “building cyber weapons at the expense of securing their own systems."
    • The Vault 7 documents detailing the CIA’s hacking tools earned the name after being published by WikiLeaks
    • CIA WikiLeaks Task Force wrote "Had the data been stolen for the benefit of a state adversary and not published, we might still be unaware of the loss"
    • They also said that the CIA "moved too slowly to put in place the safeguards that we knew were necessary given successive breaches to other U.S. Government agencies."
    • They noted that "Users shared systems administrator-level passwords, there were no effective removable media [thumb drive] controls, and historical data was available to users indefinitely"
    • It is still uncertain how much was stolen. The CIA thinks up to 2.2 billion pages of classified information may have been taken
    • Joshua Schulte is the former CIA employee accused of providing the data to WikiLeaks. His attorneys are using the report as evidence that nearly any insider could have taken it
    • A previous attempt to charge Schulte led to a partial mistrial and the US government is seeking a new trial against him
    • Senator Wyden said the report is a clear indication that Congress must pass legislation requiring intelligence agencies to adopt minimum security standards