Catalpa Hornworms


Catalpa Hornworm

Participants in the Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held this past Monday in the Boone County Arboretum (Union, KY) viewed second-generation Catalpa Hornworms (Ceratomia catalpae) enjoying a last hurrah before pupating this season. Their discovery led to a discussion on host preference, parasitoids, and a virus spun out of a wasp's genome

Catalpas (Catalpaspp., family Bignoniaceae) have long been one of my favorite trees. Both the Northern Catalpa (C. speciose) and its shorter southern cousin,S. bignonioides, sport huge, orchid-like flowers that attract a bevy of pollinators, particularly bumblebees.

Catalpa

Catalpa hornworms are the larval form of the Catalpa Sphinx Moth. The hornworms only feed on catalpa trees. An intriguing native parasitoid wasp,Cotesia congregata(family Braconidae), feeds on the caterpillars. Thus, begins a fascinating story.

The Catalpa Tree and Its Caterpillar

Sphinx moth caterpillars (family Sphingidae) are called "hornworms" owing to a distinctive "horn" on their posterior end. Catalpa hornworms sport an obvious black horn that's very apparent on all caterpillar instar stages.

Catalpa Hornworm

The caterpillars have two "color forms;" a dark form and pale form. Dark form caterpillars have a broad, "black-velvet" stripe running down their backs, and their sides are yellow to yellowish-white with black spots. Pale form caterpillars are light green or greenish‑yellow and may have a row of black spots down their back rather than a black stripe, or they may appear almost albino-like by lacking any noticeable black markings. 

Catalpa Hornworm

There are two overlapping generations per year in Ohio with large late instar first generation caterpillars feeding alongside early instar second generation caterpillars. Winter is spent as pupae buried 2 - 3" inches beneath the soil surface.

Catalpa Hornworm

Catalpa Hornworm

Although the caterpillars of this native moth are capable of producing substantial defoliation of their native host, the hornworms seldom cause significant long-term injury to the overall health of catalpa trees. Indeed, this pest - tree host relationship has been studied for many years to learn how coevolution affects relationships between native trees and their native pests.

Catalpa Hornworm

Catalpa Hornworm

The sometimes dramatic impact of the lack of a coevolutionary connection between a native pest and a non-native plant host was clearly displayed in the Arboretum. Walk-About participants found caterpillars along with some minor feeding damage on a Golden Southern Catalpa (S. bignonioides, 'Aurea').

Catalpa Hornworm

However, the amount of damage paled in comparison to the almost 100% defoliation suffered by a nearby hybridCatalpa ×erubescens'Purpurea'. The hybrid mixes northern catalpa genes with those from the Chinese catalpa (C. ovata). The stark contrast in defoliation between 'Aurea' and 'Purpurea' was also observed in 2015. One reasonable interpretation is that our native trees evolved some defenses against their hornworms. Perhaps the defenses were lost when non-native genes were introduced to produce 'Purpurea'.

Catalpa Hornworm

Catalpa Hornworm

Hornworm Caterpillars and the Wasp

Although catalpa hornworm caterpillars can occasionally produce noticeable defoliation, they must run a gauntlet of beneficial insects including parasitoid and predatory wasps. Plundering by theendoparasitoidwasp,C. congregata, is revealed when white, oblong cocoons sprout from the hornworms. Endoparasitoids develop inside their host; it's like having a predator living inside (see the movieAlien(1979)). Anectoparasitoiddoes the same while attached to the outside.

Catalpa Hornworm

Catalpa Hornworm

C. congregatais agregarious endoparasitoidmeaning that multiple wasps develop inside a single caterpillar. It also targets several species of sphinx moths. This is unusual in the parasitoid world. Most parasitoids have a relatively narrow host range owing to the complicated coevolutionary dance between the parasitoid and its host.

Catalpa Hornworm

Catalpa Hornworm

C. congregatais a well-known nemesis of catalpa hornworms; however, you will also see its white cocoons sprouting from the backs of tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata), tobacco hornworms (M. sexta), and laurel sphinx moth (Sphinx kalmiae) caterpillars. This is whyC. congregatais sometimes called the "Hornworm Wasp."

Hornworm

Hornworm

The developing wasp larvae are "programmed" not to eat any internal caterpillar structure that will kill the caterpillar. Once the immature wasps near pupation, all bets are off and wasp larvae consume all internal structures. Doomed hornworm caterpillars festooned with the white, oblong, silken cocoons signal that the wasps have completed their development.

Catalpa Hornworm

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