Tech Friday With Dave Hatter

  • IRS warns about W-2 Phishing emails:
    • "Phishing is the act of attempting to acquire information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication." - Wikipedia
    • The IRS Online Fraud Detection & Prevention Center (OFDP) reported a rise in Phishing emails going back to January 2017
    • The IRS has warned about tax related Phishing scams in the past
    • Criminals are showing increased interest in sensitive tax information 
    • OFDP indicated recent scams are targeting both individual data and mass data theft
    • In some instances, Phishing emails were followed by or combined with wire transfer requests
    • There are several variations of tax-related phishing campaigns targeting W-2 information
    • Phishing emails may come from hackers claiming to be tax preparers
    • A popular recent attack is to impersonate an executive to obtain W-2 information from a Human Resources
    • The IRS DOES NOT initiate contact with taxpayers and/or request sensitive information via email
    • If an attack is reported quickly, the IRS may be able to take steps that help protect targets from tax-related identity theft
    • To contact the IRS about a W-2 loss, email IRS at dataloss@irs.gov. Make the subject “W-2 Data Loss”
      • Do not attach any personally identifiable information (PII) data to an email
    • Attacks should also be reported to state tax agencies and the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center
    • For more information from the FBI about what to do to, visit: https://www.ic3.gov/media/2018/180221.aspx
    • Businesses should limit the number of staff handling wire transfers, adopt multifactor authentication and verbally confirm requests for sensitive data
  • A new study reports that most consumers find marketing personalization creepy:
    • The 13th annual Accenture Strategy Global Consumer Pulse Research found 41% of consumers switched companies last year over a lack of trust and poor personalization
    • The study surveyed more than 25,000 consumers globally and 2,000 in the U.S. 
    • Some findings include:
      • 43% of U.S. consumers are more likely to make purchases with personalized experiences
      • 31% value services that personalize recommendations
      • 48% said they would use smart reordering services  
      • 92% state that privacy for personal information is important
      • 79% are frustrated that some companies can’t be trusted to secure personal information
    • InMoment's "2018 CX Trends Report" found:
      • 75% of consumers find personalization at least somewhat creepy
      • 40% of brands admit to being creepy in the way they personalize marketing 
      • Roughly half of consumers continue shopping with brands after a creepy experience, 22% left that brand
      • Almost half say they hesitate to give away information due to privacy concerns and lack of return on the information divulged
    • If you're not paying with money, you're paying with data
    • If you're not a paying customer, you're the product
  • Privacy mistakes that can have serious negative consequences:
    • Putting too much online
    • Not understanding social media "privacy" settings
    • Being too friendly with co-workers online
    • Not understanding your employer's policies
    • Careless email usage
    • Inadequate security for your devices
    • Poor password hygiene
    • Ignoring old social media accounts you no longer use
    • Leaking your location information
    • Being too private to the point of appearing nonexistent 

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