Tech Friday with Dave Hatter - June 26th 2020 - SPONSORED BY INTRUST IT


  • Hackers can use information found in photos posted on social media:
    • Social media continues to be a great boon for hackers
    • Facebook, Twitter, etc. make gaining access to personal and business information that people share rather easy
    • Using social media sites, search engines and other information found online is referred to as Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)
    • A 2016 study by The University of Phoenix found that 84% of U.S. adults claim to have at least one social media account
    • The same survey reported that "Nearly two in three U.S. adults who have personal social media profiles say they are aware that their accounts have been hacked and 86 percent agree they limit the personal information they post due to the fear of it being accessed by hackers"
    • Unfortunately, many people are unaware of or ignore the danger of inadvertently leaking sensitive personal information when they post on social media
    • This is especially true when it comes to images which may capture sensitive information and typically contain metadata that is not obvious to the naked eye
    • The metadata is known as EXIF data and most modern smartphones capture it when a photo is taken
    • EXIF data provides a wealth of information including the device used, the date and time, and in many cases the GPS coordinates of the location
    • Instagram is known for Geotagging, which is storing the latitude and longitude of your current location with your photo
    • In Windows, you can right-click a photo, select “Properties,” and then click the “Details” tab in the properties window to see the metadata
    • Hackers that use this data are more like analysts or stalkers than typical cybercriminals, and in many if not most instances, no laws are broken when this information is accessed
    • A photo with your license plate can be used to learn alot about you
    • A photo of your desk may leak sensitive information or passwords
    • A photo of your employee badge could be used to attack your company
    • A photo of a key could be used to make a duplicate of that key
    • Additionally, people over share sensitive information that can be use to guess passwords or security questions
    • Ways this information could be used include:
      • Lawyers/creditors/ex-spouses lay claim to assets
      • Stalkers can use this information to track and harass
      • Police or detectives use this information for investigations
      • Thieves can learn about your assets and when your home or business is empty
    • Things you can do include:
      •  Reduce your use of social media
      • Understand the risks and that photos may contain metadata
      • Think carefully about the information you are sharing and how it might be used
      • Understand that once something is posted online it's essentially forever
  • Apple and Google contact tracing API update:
    • Many questions have been raised about the announcement that Apple and Google would work together to create a contact tracing API for their devices
    • Some have been concerned that they now have a contact tracing app installed without their permission
    • In actuality, neither Apple nor Google have downloaded an app to your smartphone
    • Yes, if you have recently updated your device, you will see a feature related to contact tracing
    • But that does not mean an app has been installed, it merely means that the contact tracing API is now available for use
    • In order to use it, you need to enable it and install a participating app to be tracked
    • Again, it's just the framework that will allow such an app to function once it becomes available AND if you choose to install it.
    • In a joint statement from Apple and Google published back on May 20th, they said "What we’ve built is not an app - rather public health agencies will incorporate the API into their own apps that people install. Our technology is designed to make these apps work better."
    • For now, nobody can or will install a COVID-19 tracking app on your phone
    • If you do install one when available, you still must have to agree to the various permissions the application requires to work effectively
    • And for now, you can opt-out even if you install one at some point and change your mind
    • Beware "contact tracing" apps that are actually malware
    • Read the Apple and Google joint statement here:https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/apple-google-exposure-notification-api-launches/
    • Read statement on privacy and contact tracing here:https://www.apple.com/covid19/contacttracing/
  • Apple Car Key: wirelessly unlock your car with an iPhone:
    • Apple recently announced that you’ll be able to add a digital car key to your iPhone or Apple Watch
    • This feature will be included in iOS 14 and uses Near Field Communication (NFC)
    • The new 2021 BMW 5 Series will be the first supported vehicle
    • Apple is working on an industry-wide standard that would use its U1 ultra wideband (UWB) chip instead rather than NFC
    • Once your phone is paired to a car that supports digital keys, you simply hold your device near a NFC reader in the car
    • You aren't required to confirm your identity by default, but you can enable “Express Mode” for additional security
    • Apple says the digital car keys work with no network connection and will work “for up to 5 hours” after your iPhone’s battery has hit “power reserve” mode
    • You'll be able to share your key via the Messages app.You can restrict certain features in your car with a shared key including top speed
    • For those concerned about privacy, Apple won't know when you unlock your car or who you share keys with
    • UWB tech could allow you to "unlock your car while your iPhone stays in your bag or pocket"
    • For the moment, automakers need to provide NFC readers
    • Other carmakers already offer digital keys but they’re a separate app. With this new feature, you could potentially keep the digital keys for multiple cars in your Apple device

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