Tech Friday with Dave Hatter- January 3rd 2020 - SPONSORED BY INTRUST IT


  • China's TikTok app increasingly under fire:
    • TikTok is a very popular social media app with nearly 1 billion downloads
    • It's a free app (iOS and Android) that specializes in 15 second videos that loop
    • TikTok was hit with a record $5.7 million fine by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) who ruled that TikTok violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
    • Besides illegally collecting information from kids under 13, the app lets users send direct messages and interact via comments
    • There have been many warnings about adults contacting children through the app
    • Recently, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in the UK launched an investigation to determine if TikTok violated the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
    • "We know that a significant amount of children are being contacted via popular livestreaming apps, such as TikTok, by abusers who are using them as a hunting ground," a spokesperson for the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) said recently
    • Now the US Army has joined the US Navy and banned the use TikTok on government-issued devices due to security concerns
    • It is considered a cyber threat," a US Army spokesperson told Military.com. "We do not allow it on government phones"
    • The social media video app is known as Douyin in China and is owned by Beijing-based ByteDance
    • "[Chinese apps] are increasingly being used to censor content and silence open discussion on topics deemed sensitive by the Chinese Government and Communist Party," Senator Marco Rubio said
  • California Consumer Privacy Act sets stringent privacy rules:
    • As of today, California is the first state in the union to implement a stringent and comprehensive data privacy law known as the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)
    • California has taken the lead on data privacy regulations and CCPA comes amid a pressure from several different levels of government legislate privacy
    • CCPA applies to businesses that have information about California residents AND have annual revenues over $25 million, collect data on 50,000 consumers or more, or make 50% or more of their revenue from selling data
    • Similar in some ways to the EU's GDPR, CCPA allows Californians to view information that companies that fit the criteria above have amassed about them, and to opt out
    • California's Governor Newsom signed the bill into law in June of 2018, but California Attorney General Xavier Becerra has not yet released the final version of the regulations
    • The new law will not be enforced until July 1 or six months after the final draft
    • A spokesperson for AG Becerra said "While we can’t take action until six months after finalizing our rules, or July 1 — whichever comes first — we can consider a business’s efforts to comply with the law from January 1, onwards"
    • As most businesses do business in California, this state law will have far-reaching repercussion across the country
    • Several large tech companies including Microsoft and Mozilla have said they will apply CCPA rules to all customers
    • To date, the response from US companies has been inconsistent as they scramble to determine how to handle these new regulations
    • Congress has been debating a federal privacy statute for some time with little action
    • Apple CEO Tim Cook has recently said now it the time for privacy legislation
    • Other states are moving in this direction. Maine and Nevada have already passed less stringent laws and roughly 12 other states are considering privacy legislation
    • California may pass additional rules in 2020 which could create an independent agency to enforce data privacy and an opt-in system for internet users under 16
    • Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said “I think the fairest way is opt-in"
    • Expect to see more states follow suit in some form or fashion
  • What to expect from CES 2020:
    • CES (Consumer Electronics Show) is one of the biggest tech events of the year and a major showplace for companies to launch new products
    • Every January since 1967 analysts, journalists, technologists and businessed descend on Las Vegas to see the and show the latest technology
    • In 2019, CES had more than 175,000 attendees, over 4,500 exhibitors and over 1,000 speakers
    • It's a great opportunity to see the latest in technology, but some of the largest tech companies like Apple and Samsung typically unveil their best stuff at their own signature events
    • CES runs from January 7th through the 10th this year
    • Per their website, topics that will be featured include:
      • 5G
      • Internet of Things (IoT)
      • Autonomous vehicles and vehicle related technology
      • Blockchain
      • Cryptocurrency
      • Digital Health
      • Home Entertainment
      • "Smart" Home
      • Augmented & Virtual Reality
      • Gaming
      • Artificial Intelligence
      • Drones
      • Robotics
      • Esports
    • "Often times, CES is where you see the efforts of a technology and how it's making its way into the market," said Avi Greengart from Techsponential
    • CES 2020 will likely be more of the same technologies that have dominated recent years including augmented reality, 5G, autonomous cars, high-end TVs, wearable and IoT gadgets
    • Learn more about CES and follow all the latest announcements at:https://www.ces.tech/
    • If you can't make it to Vegas, check out the Cintrifuse Virtual CES here in Cincinnati on January 9, 2020. Details:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cintrifuse-virtual-ces-tickets-84666528867