Tech Friday with Dave Hatter - April 17th 2020 - SPONSORED BY INTRUST IT


Microsoft Fixes 114 bugs for April 2021PatchTuesday:

  • Microsoft credited the NSA for finding two remote code execution vulnerability flaws in Exchange Server. Both bugs are critical
  • Microsoft and the US National Security Agency urged installing the fixes
  • There were 55 remote code execution bugs. More than half were tied to Windows’ Remote Procedure Call (RPC) interface
  • The patches cover a wide array of products including Windows, Edge, Azure, Microsoft Office, SharePoint Server and Exchange Server
  • This is the largest patch so far this year
  • Thepatchescover a wide array of Microsoft products
  • Get the details here:https://msrc.microsoft.com/update-guide/releaseNote/2021-Apr
  • Other important updates include:
    • Adobe released a critical updates
    • Google released critical updates for Chrome and Android

AI will soon be hiring and firing:

  • Algorithms are making increasingly high-stakes decisions about our work lives
  • No laws protect workers from the risk of unfair treatment and discrimination as a result
  • For example, algorithms often scour resumes for key information and make decisions about moving the candidate forward in the process
  • AI may also do background checks and analyze that data
  • In one case, Amazon's scrapped this technology after it was found to discrimate against women's resumes
  • The Trades Union Congress (TUC), the UK's national trade union federation, warned of "huge gaps" in law over the deployment of AI at work
  • They called for legal reform to prevent algorithms from causing widespread harm to employees
  • Recommendations from TUC include allowing workers to know what technologies might affect them and a right to challenge unfair or discriminatory decisions made by AI 
  • The TUC's manifesto was published alongside a report from employment rights lawyers which said employment law is not keeping pace with the rapid expansion of AI in the workplace
  • Europe's human rights watchdog, the Council of Europe, has called for an outright ban on facial recognition where it poses a risk of discrimination. 
  • Read the report here:https://www.tuc.org.uk/sites/default/files/Technology_Managing_People_2021_Report_AW_0.pdf

Detroit police sued over false facial recognition match that led to arrest:

  • A lawsuit is questioning the risk of throwing innocent people in jail
  • Detroit police have been sued by a Michigan man after he was falsely identified as a shoplifting suspect by the department’s facial recognition software and then arrested in front of his children
  • Robert Williams was arrested for stealing watches from a store after police used a facial recognition to search the store’s surveillance-camera footage
  • Williams’s case raised concerns about the growing use technology that research has shown to misidentify people of color
  • Several facial recognition algorithms tested in a 2019 federal study were up to 100 times more likely to misidentify people of color
  • This is at least the third US lawsuit brought by black men falsely identified by facial recognition
  • Detroit police spokesperson SGT Nicole Kirkwood said the department does not comment on pending litigation
  • Kirkwood referred to previous comments from Detroit Police Chief Daniel Craig last year who said the case “had nothing to do with technology, but certainly had everything to do with poor investigative work.”
  • Williams was identified as the thief from a blurry surveillance camera image sent to the Michigan State Police (MSP)
  • The accuracy of facial recognition software is highly dependent on image quality
  • The MSP ran a search that pointed to Williams’s old driver’s license photo as a possible match
  • The MSP's "investigative lead report" notes in capital letters that the document was not a positive identification or sufficient probable cause for an arrest
  • The Detroit police detective submitted the photo to prosecutors as evidence for a warrant anyway
  • Facial recognition software has been banned in over a dozen cities nationwide
  • This case could impact the use of the technology which is increasingly used by law enforcement nationwide