Asian Longhorned Beetle UPDATE


This post is designed to keep you up-to-date with Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts and serve as a meaningful resource for the most current information. Presently, there are active eradication programs operating in four states: South Carolina, Ohio, Massachusetts, and New York. The following information pertains to activities in each of these states.

South Carolina – First detection in June 2020

Regulated Area: 58.6 sq. miles

58.6 – Charleston County (Adams Run, Charleston, Hollywood, Johns Island, Ravenel)

Infested Trees: 3,940

60 – Adams Run

28 – Charleston

3,715 – Hollywood

62 – Johns Island

75 – Ravenel

Removals: 273

247 Infested:

  0 – Adams Run

  0 – Charleston

  247 – Hollywood

  0 – Johns Island

  0 – Ravenel

26 High-risk hosts

  0 – Adams Run

  0 – Charleston

  26 – Hollywood

  0 – Johns Island

  0 – Ravenel

Surveys: 28,574

Tree inspection surveys are helping to determine the size and scope of the infestation. Until the wood material management yard and quarantine are established, all residents in infested areas should stop moving firewood and tree debris from these communities. Movement of firewood, storm debris and tree parts can spread Asian longhorned beetle and establish new infestations elsewhere. Even if beetles are not seen, eggs and larva can be moved within the material. To report the beetle or tree damage, please call 843-973-8329.

OHIO – First detection in June 2011

Regulated Area: 56.5 sq. miles*

56.5 – Clermont County (Tate and Williamsburg Townships)

Infested Trees: 21,273

21,188 – Tate Township

48 – Monroe Township

3 – Stonelick/Batavia Township

34 – East Fork Recreational Area

Removals: 110,430

20,373 Infested:

  20,288 – Tate Township

  48 – Monroe Township

  3 – Stonelick/Batavia Township

  34 – East Fork Recreation Area

90,057 High-risk hosts

  72,544 – Tate Township

  1,138 – Monroe Township

  0 – Stonelick/Batavia Township

  16,375 – East Fork Recreation Area

Surveys: 3,517,882

* Monroe Township declared eradication in September 2018, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by .5 sq. miles. Stonelick and Batavia Townships declared eradication in March 2018, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by 5 sq. miles.

Ground and aerial survey crews continue to conduct delimiting surveys, inspecting all host trees throughout the regulated areas in Clermont County. Staff continues to monitor regulated areas, respond to service calls and conduct training sessions for compliance agreements. To report suspicious activity, please call 513-381-7180. Infested trees are removed throughout the year, as they are detected. The wood disposal yard located at 2896 State Route 232 in Bethel is open for business: Mon. through Fri. from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Wood chips are available for residents from 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. on the first Sat. of every month, however wood chips will not be available on Sat., April 4. ClickOhiofor more information.

MASSACHUSETTS – First detection in August 2008

Regulated Area: 110 sq. miles*

110 – Worcester County (Worcester, West Boylston, Boylston, Holden, Shrewsbury, Auburn)

Infested Trees:24,208**

20,759 – Worcester

1,097 – Shrewsbury

233 – Holden

699 – West Boylston

1,413 – Boylston

1 – Auburn

6 – Boston

Removals: 36,247**

24,191 Infested:

  20,759 – Worcester

  1,097 – Shrewsbury

  235 – Holden

  697 – West Boylston

  1,396 – Boylston

  1 – Auburn

  6 – Boston

12,056 High-risk hosts:

  11,950 – Worcester

  44 – Shrewsbury

  0 – Holden

  33 – West Boylston

  29 – Boylston

  0 – Auburn

  0 – Boston

Surveys: Inspections continue

* Boston (Suffolk County) declared eradication in 2014, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by 10 sq. miles.

** In 2018 audits were performed on the tree totals and the counts shown represent the correct totals. Due to additional host trees removed through acreage cuts within the regulated area, the actual number of infested trees and the actual number of trees removed is unknown.

Ground and aerial survey crews continue to conduct delimiting surveys, inspecting all host trees throughout the regulated areas in Worcester County. Staff continues to monitor regulated area, respond to service calls and conduct training sessions for compliance agreements. To report suspicious activity, please call 508-852-8110. The program continues to remove and destroy infested trees. Infested trees are removed throughout the year, as they are detected. The wood disposal yard is now located at 0 Dr. Paul Ware Drive in Boylston and is open for business Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. ClickMassachusettsfor more information.

NEW YORK – First detection in August 1996

Regulated Area: 53 sq. miles*

53 – Nassau/Suffolk County (Amityville)

Infested Trees: 7,207

2,327 – Brooklyn

1,831 – Queens

110 – Manhattan

2,855 – Amityville

27 – Islip

57 – Staten Island, includes Pralls Island

Removals: 24,058

7,206 Infested:

2,327 – Brooklyn

1,831 – Queens

110 – Manhattan

2,854 – Amityville

27 – Islip

57 – Staten Island, includes Pralls Island

16,852 High-risk hosts:

139 – Brooklyn

911 – Queens

20 – Manhattan

5,360 – Amityville

154 – Islip

10,268 – Staten Island, includes Pralls Island

Surveys: Inspections continue

* Brooklyn and Queens declared eradication in 2019, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by 58 sq. miles. A new infestation detected in the Amityville area in 2013 resulted in an increase of the regulated area by 28 sq. miles. Manhattan (New York County) and Staten Island (Richmond County) declared eradication in 2013, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by 26 sq. miles. Islip (Suffolk County) declared eradication in 2011, resulting in a reduction of the regulated area by 7 sq. miles.

Ground and aerial survey crews continue to conduct surveys, inspecting all host trees throughout the regulated areas in Nassau/Suffolk counties. Staff continues to monitor regulated areas, respond to service calls and conduct training sessions for compliance agreements. ClickNew Yorkfor more information.

OTHER STATES:

Eradication efforts eliminated infestations and removed regulations in Illinois (2008) and New Jersey (2013).

REMINDERS:

The mission of the eradication program is to help save trees and to eliminate the beetle from infested areas. Residents in Asian longhorned beetle regulated areas cannot move firewood or wood debris outside of the regulated area. Residents are also discouraged from moving firewood and wood debris inside the regulated area. In the event of inclement weather, surveys and infested tree removals may be delayed or cancelled.

If you think you’ve found an Asian longhorned beetle or signs of infestation, always record the area where the specimen was found. If possible, capture the insect you think is an Asian longhorned beetle, place it in a jar and freeze it — this will preserve the insect for easy identification. Take digital pictures of the insect and damage to your trees in case officials request them, andReport It.

More Information:

There are other ways to stay informed about Asian longhorned beetle eradication efforts:

WEBSITE:www.AsianLonghornedBeetle.com orAPHIS Asian longhorned beetle

FACEBOOK:facebook.com/asianlonghornbeetle

YOUTUBE:youtube.com/user/BeetleBusters

TWITTER:@StopALB

For local information about eradication activities, or if you think you’ve found an insect or signs of infestation, please call1-866-702-9938, or contact your state’s ALB eradication program office directly:

South Carolina: 843-973-8329

Ohio: 513-381-7180

Massachusetts: 508-852-8090

New York: 800-STOP-ALB or 631-598-5943